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A Look at USPA Finances

A Look at USPA Finances

The annual audit of USPA for 2016 completed in August 2017 reported sound fiscal management and accountability measures. more »

The Brave New World of Parachute R&D—How Computer-Aided Design Drives Innovation

The Brave New World of Parachute R&D—How Computer-Aided Design Drives Innovation

The story of a canopy is never as simple as scratching down some math and heading over to a cutting table. more »

Wingsuit Deployments Part 2

Wingsuit Deployments Part 2

Advanced Techniques by Matt Gerdes with contributions from Chris Geiler, Will Kitto and Rich Webb. more »

The Seven Keys to Downsizing

The Seven Keys to Downsizing

“The most deadly aspect of skydiving isn’t swooping or wingsuiting or big-ways or collisions or whatever you think it is. It’s lack of patience.” more »

The Seven Keys to Downsizing

“The most deadly aspect of skydiving isn’t swooping or wingsuiting or big-ways or collisions or whatever you think it is. It’s lack of patience.”

An old-timer who had certainly lost more than his share of friends to the phenomenon sighed out this thought while sitting around a campfire at the Holiday Boogie at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Truer words have never been spoken about the sport. more »

Summer in Seattle

A USPA Staff Report more »

Gearing Up

Ed ScottFor eight years, five months and counting, USPA members have enjoyed the longest run ever without a dues increase. That streak will end on January 1, when USPA dues and rating and license fees go up an average of 20 percent. No one on the staff or the board takes such action lightly, and both should be commended for making the 2009 dues change last as long as possible. more »

Back-Fly backward Drive

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photo by David Cherry. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Misrouted Pud Bridle

A jumper using a pull-out pilot chute (known as a “pud”) experienced a total malfunction due to a misrouting of the main-closing-pin bridle. The jumper could extract the pud’s handle but couldn’t extract the pin due to the misrouting. The jumper pulled her reserve ripcord and landed uneventfully under her reserve parachute. more »

Breaking the Links in the Chain

Survey information provided by members of USPA indicates that “Incident Reports” is one of the most important and widely read sections of Parachutist magazine. Apparently, we all see the value in learning from these reports in hopes of avoiding a similar situation on our own skydives. Skydivers are not unique in learning through this type of process. Airplane pilots, BASE jumpers, scuba divers and all sorts of people who participate in potentially dangerous activities study accident information. An entire government agency, the National Transportation Safety Board, is dedicated to investigating accidents in every form of transportation, all in the name of discovering their true causes and developing recommendations for avoiding them in the future. So it is not unusual at all that you would want to read “Incident Reports” for educational purposes. more »

Putting Your Name on the Line

Instructors and instructor examiners are responsible for lots of things when working with license and rating candidates. One of the most important and often overlooked tasks is the verification of license and rating requirements. Every USPA license requires the candidate to complete a minimum number of jumps and amount of freefall time. Every USPA rating requires a minimum number of jumps and amount of freefall time, and the candidate must hold a license of a certain level or higher. Every new examiner rating requires a minimum number of total jumps, student jumps and evaluation jumps. In other words, there is a lot to verify! It is important that the instructor or instructor examiner verifies these requirements through logbook entries or even drop zone manifest records to make sure that the candidate has met the jump number, freefall time and other requirements. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Vicki Dillon

I frequently said that for my 50th birthday, I wanted to make a skydive. Just before my 48th birthday, my son, who had recently achieved his A license, said, “Mom, don’t wait. You are going to love it.” A few weeks later I took my first jump and knew I was going to do more. more »

Profile - Sean MacCormac | D-18844

By Brian Giboney

Sean MacCormac is a devoted father of three and an iconic skydiver who originally made his mark in skysurfing. As a skysurfer, he perfected the “invisible man” self-propelled spin, on one jump exceeding 12 revolutions per second. He also participated in the development of the Space Games freefly competition. Currently, MacCormac is a member of the Red Bull Air Force, promoting the sport of skydiving around the globe. He is also a stuntman who performed stunts for movies such as “Iron Man 3,” “Godzilla,” “Point Break” (the 2015 remake) and “The Hangover Part III.” more »

Gearing Up

Ed Scott With proposed air-traffic-control privatization, skydiving—and indeed all of general aviation—is facing the gravest threat to its longevity and future than ever before. If the 21st Century AIRR Act, otherwise known as H.R. 2997, goes through the U.S. Congress and the president signs it into law, it would carve the ATC function out of the Federal Aviation Administration and hand it to a new private corporation funded by new aviation user fees. (As written, the bill exempts general aviation from user fees, but any future Congress could change that.) more »

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Ed Scott
Publisher

Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
Managing Editor

Colby Walls
Graphic Designer

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