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Airmanship for Canopy Pilots

Airmanship for Canopy Pilots

As an aircraft pilot should be aware of his aircraft, the environment in which the aircraft operates and his own capabilities, skydivers must possess awareness and discipline when flying canopies. more »

How to Nail a Gear Check

How to Nail a Gear Check

Let me ask you this: When was the last time that you saw the pilot running down a safety checklist on the jump plane? If you’re paying attention, you certainly have. more »

Military Aviation's Lessons for Skydivers

Pilots die more often in training mishaps than from enemy actions. This safety training includes lessons on the Swiss-cheese-mishap model, normalization of deviance, complacency and risk management. But how does this apply to skydiving? more »

Parachute Flight Dynamics

Parachute Flight Dynamics

The goal of any skilled canopy pilot is to take command of the parachute system so as to dictate his location under the wing at any given time. more »

Supervising the Fledglings

At nearly every drop zone around the country, skydiving students receive careful attention and helpful guidance to ensure that they progress toward completing their training and earning their USPA A licenses as safely as possible. And then, just as their little feathers are blossoming, we toss them out of the nest and hope that they have learned to fly well enough to stay out of harm's way. more »

Gearing Up - May 2016

Tag: May 2016

EdScott

USPA is having a milestone birthday this year, and you are invited to help celebrate! Join the USPA Board and staff on Saturday, July 23, at USPA Headquarters in Fredericksburg, Virginia, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of our formal start. more »

Peak Experiences in Skydiving

Visit any drop zone and you’ll soon start enjoying the good vibes. Skydivers are friendly, possess high energy and are extremely passionate about freefalling through the sky. Excitement is in the air, and it’s easy to see why. Skydivers take premeditated risks by leaping out of perfectly good airplanes. It’s what we do, and we love it. The daily camaraderie on drop zones is compelling and is one of the major things that attracts new skydivers to the sport. It’s an activity filled with confident, competent and enthusiastic people.

However, there is more to it than that. New skydivers soon begin to understand what almost everybody on the DZ realizes: It isn’t just surviving each skydive that matters; it’s what happens during the skydive. And what happens on the next skydive could be that very special time when everything comes together for a great experience. more »

Dangers of the Sport—The 2015 Fatality Summary

During 2015, 21 people died skydiving in the U.S. Considering how much USPA’s membership has grown in recent years, this shows that the sport is becoming safer as it is maturing. However, the jumpers who died in 2015 generally could have avoided the circumstances that caused their deaths, many of which involved the same errors that killed jumpers in the past. The purpose of this article is to identify those hazards so jumpers can avoid them in the future. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Steve Phelps

Steve Phelps | D-26782; AFF, tandem and IAD instructor; PRO rating | Bixby, Oklahoma

In September 1979, I had to make a very difficult decision, one that brought decades of regret. I was a U.S. Army Green Beret on Operational Detachment A Team 552, a green-light team that performed HALO jumps and SCUBA dives. I had completed Underwater Operations Training (SCUBA school) the previous year and was slotted to go to HALO school. I was ready to extend my time in the Special Forces to attend the school, but at the last minute my company commander told me that I must re-enlist; an extension was not enough. My wife had just had our first child, a girl, and I had plans for college, so I refused and left the service when my enlistment expired a few months later. more »

Profile - Marian Sparks | D-29599

by Brian Giboney

Marian Sparks started skydiving at age 51 and has gone on to make more than 2,100 jumps and set numerous large-formation skydiving records. Sparks is a breast cancer survivor who decided to use her skydiving skills to give back to The Rose, a Houston-area facility that provides breast-cancer services to uninsured women, which saved her life in 2005. She and a group of sky friends founded Jump for the Rose in 2010 to raise money for the non-profit through events and record attempts. Sparks has inspired many people, and the energy she devotes to helping others is contagious. more »

Back-Fly Turns (Heading Changes)

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Master Rigger Mistakes

The owner of this rig (who is a drop zone owner and rigger) picked it up after a Federal Aviation Administration Master Rigger employed by the drop zone had repacked it. The owner noticed that the reserve flaps were closed in the wrong order. Even more bizarrely, the master rigger had renumbered the reserve container flaps by writing new numbers on the flap edges with a black magic marker. The rig owner brought the errors to the attention of the rigger, who was indifferent and unconcerned about the mistake.

more »

Weather Woes

Unless you live in Southern California, you’ve probably heard a joke about your local weather that goes something like, “If you don’t like the current weather, just wait an hour, and it will change!” There are very few places in the world with consistently sunny, warm and perfect skydiving weather. As jumpers, we don’t have to hold PhDs in meteorology, but we still need to understand the basics. Knowing what weather to look out for can prevent an injury or fatality.

more »

Flag-Jump Safety

Demo jumps are some of the most rewarding skydives a person can make. Due to the sizes and locations of landing areas, most demos require the jumpers to hold USPA PRO Ratings. This rating requires a jumper to demonstrate landing accuracy on 10 pre-declared jumps, receive training for flag and smoke jumps, serve as a ground crew member, learn about crowd control and understand how to work with the Federal Aviation Administration on demo-jump authorizations. USPA designed this training to help ensure that jumpers perform demos safely. more »

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Ed Scott
Publisher

Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
Managing Editor

Colby Walls
Graphic Designer

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