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Airmanship for Canopy Pilots

Airmanship for Canopy Pilots

As an aircraft pilot should be aware of his aircraft, the environment in which the aircraft operates and his own capabilities, skydivers must possess awareness and discipline when flying canopies. more »

How to Nail a Gear Check

How to Nail a Gear Check

Let me ask you this: When was the last time that you saw the pilot running down a safety checklist on the jump plane? If you’re paying attention, you certainly have. more »

Military Aviation's Lessons for Skydivers

Pilots die more often in training mishaps than from enemy actions. This safety training includes lessons on the Swiss-cheese-mishap model, normalization of deviance, complacency and risk management. But how does this apply to skydiving? more »

Parachute Flight Dynamics

Parachute Flight Dynamics

The goal of any skilled canopy pilot is to take command of the parachute system so as to dictate his location under the wing at any given time. more »

Gearing Up - April 2016

EdScott

Gearing Up This year, at Skydive Chicago in Ottawa, Illinois, September 10-21, the United States will host the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale World Parachuting Championships Mondial for the first time ever. The Mondial includes championships in all skydiving disciplines save the World Championships of Wingsuit Flying, which Skydive City Zephyrhills in Florida will host November 2-10, and the World Championships of Canopy Piloting, which Skydive Farnham in Canada will host August 20-27. The event will be a momentous occasion, when the members of our U.S. Parachute Team will compete against the world’s best skydivers on our home soil and in front of our home crowd. more »

How to Keep Your Expensive, Life-Saving Equipment Looking Like Expensive, Life-Saving Equipment

The few weeks after you get a new car are probably when you keep it the cleanest and most well maintained it will ever be. You’ve just spent a lot of money, and you hope it will last a long time. Maybe you promise that this time will be different—you’re going to take excellent care it—but then get busy or complacent and before you know it, the floorboards are sprouting potatoes.
The same thing can happen when you purchase skydiving gear. Even though the gear is important (after all, it saves your life on every jump), your consideration of it can dissipate rather quickly. And for some, that consideration may never have been there to begin with. more »

Buying Used Gear—Part Two of Two

Last month, you read about how to choose your canopies and measure for the rig you selected to fit them. Now it’s time to start shopping. It would be great to be able to choose a size for a rig and canopies and then just mine the used gear listings, make a few calls, send a check and start skydiving. Oh, if only it were so simple! more »

Action Cameras

Action cameras have completely changed our sport by making it simple for almost anyone to capture high-definition and high-quality video and still images in the sky. These days, creating a camera helmet requires only placing an adhesive mount onto your existing helmet. Gone are the days of building your own comparatively enormous custom camera helmet with power tools, soldering irons, hot knives and makeshift camera mounts. However, back then, jumpers who strapped 10-pound-plus camera helmets on their heads were painfully aware that the added equipment posed extra safety considerations. Today, because GoPros and other action cameras are so small, light and easy to use, many of those added risks are not as apparent. But even if you barely feel that the camera is there, there are additional safety factors you should be aware of and some tips and tricks that will make it easier to get up and running. more »

Profile - Nancy Gruttman-Tyler | D-3631

by Brian Giboney

Nancy Gruttman-Tyler, D-3631, made her first leap from an airplane in 1969. She was on the first 16-way all-female star in 1974, served on USPA’s board of directors from 1977-1981 and was one of the first female AFF instructors. After taking 30 years off from jumping—she served her country in the U.S. Army and deployed to several war zones—Gruttman-Tyler returned to the sport in her 60s. She is once again a very active jumper and administers the popular Women’s Star Crest Recipient Awards program, which recognizes those who participate in skydives that include eight or more women. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Olga Wilhelmine Munding

by Olga Wilhelmine Munding | B-42017 | New Orleans, Louisiana

“What do you want to be when you grow up?” asked the captain of a 747 jumbo jet flying overseas. I was barely 6 years old, visiting the cockpit (they used to let kids do that), and the pilots were showing me what is was like to be up front. Grinning, I flashed my missing front baby teeth and said, “I want to be a pilot and an artist.” Hmmm ... yes, indeed. more »

Going Low

by Dan Brodsky-Chenfeld | D-8424 and the Author of “Above All Else”
danbrodsky-chenfeld.com

Skydiving is a sport like any other, and there are plenty of mistakes to make when playing the game. Baseball players strike out. Football players fumble. Big-way formation skydivers go low. When someone goes low, the jump is usually over. Of all the mistakes a jumper can make, going low is the one that is most talked about, laughed about (or cried over) and feared by large-formation skydivers. more »

Fouled Toggle

After deployment, this jumper collapsed his slider and started to release his brakes when he realized that the excess steering line was loose and had wrapped around one steering toggle. Had he pulled the toggle through the loop of excess, the steering line would have locked onto the guide ring on the back of the riser. This would have resulted in an uncontrollable main canopy and required a cut away and reserve activation. The jumper moved the excess steering line out of the way before grabbing the toggle and releasing the brakes. Properly stowing the toggles and excess steering line can prevent this problem. more »

Head-Down Forward Movement in the Daffy Position

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Five Hazardous Attitudes

The aviation world long ago identified five hazardous attitudes that lead to trouble for pilots flying airplanes. The FAA published these findings in chapter 17 of its “Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge” (available as a PDF at faa.gov). These attitudes are also very relevant to skydivers. Jumpers, as well as pilots, can begin to make better decisions by identifying the hazardous attitudes and minimizing them. more »

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Ed Scott
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Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
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Colby Walls
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