Showcase

Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

B.J. Worth did not just influence the sport of skydiving, he defined an era. His thumbprint appears on most of the significant developments from the 1970s through the last decade. more »

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

If you’re squaring up to the requirements for your D license, there’s a good possibility that those jumps are causing a bit of nail-biting. Steve Woodford is here to tell you not to worry. more »

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Greg was a typical young parachutist with a great sense of humor who loved to joke with his fellow jumpers. But when it came to skydiving, he was quiet and deadly serious. more »

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

It’s great that jumpers are finally catching up to what the pioneers were doing 16 years ago, but with so much freefall traffic and so many people trying new things, it’s essential for everyone to learn how to be safe so we can keep on playing. more »

Demonstrating Good Sense

Skydivers have to demonstrate a variety of skills and knowledge to earn the USPA PRO rating, which many of the public demonstration jumps conducted around the country each year require. Jumpers must train to jump with smoke and flags, learn to file a request for authorization with the local Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office, complete 10 accuracy jumps and demonstrate proficiency in many other ways. But one of the most important attributes that every PRO jumper must have is not on the test: knowing when to say no and call off a demo jump. more »

Christmas Cameras

So Santa dropped a shiny new GoPro under the tree, and you are just dying to start jumping with it, right? Well, dying to jump with it could literally be the case, so be sure you are ready for the added challenges before you slap that thing on your helmet on the first warm day of the season. Jumping with a video camera involves challenges, many of which are not obvious to those who decide to start jumping with one. USPA recommends that anyone jumping with a camera hold at least a USPA C license (200 jumps), but jump numbers are not the only consideration. Before you start, check out Section 6-8 of the Skydiver’s Information Manual, which includes lots of helpful information. more »

Gearing Up - February 2017

EdScott

This month's "Gearing Up" is written for just 22 of you. If 2017 is an average year in the U.S. accident-wise, some 22 of you won't be around to read this column in next February's Parachutist due to a skydiving accident. Let that sink in: 22 of you reading this will die making your last skydive. Odds are you're licensed (most likely a C or D license), have been skydiving for at least 10 years and have just at or over 1,000 jumps. (Don't think you're off the hook if you're not nearly that experienced, since these are averages; less-experienced skydivers will be among them.) Statistics also tell us that the circumstances of your demise will likely involve a hard landing, a mishandled main-parachute malfunction or a collision.

If you knew you were one of the 22, would you take five specific actions to remove yourself from the forlorn list? Of course you would. And you don't even have to quit skydiving. more »

I've Just Learned to Freefly... Now What?

Jumping out of a plane in any form is pretty good, but for many, it is freefly that really rustles their jimmies. Even after you’ve made your first successful freefly jumps, it takes no small effort—bashing away at complex body positions and safety procedures to reprogram how your brain understands movement—to continue learning. Whether you are approaching freefly as a brand-new skydiver or after years of experience falling on your belly, the important thing is that you are about to access a bonanza of challenges and rewards. Here are some of the key lessons that will help as you progress onward from your first successful freefly jumps. more »

MFS Block 1 - Double 69

 

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by David Cherry. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Misassembled Reserve Soft Links

During a routine reserve canopy and container inspection and repack, a Federal Aviation Administration Master Rigger discovered that all of the soft links used to attach the reserve canopy’s suspension lines to the four risers were assembled incorrectly. The looped end of the soft link was slipped over the metal loop but had not first passed through the other end of the soft link and formed a lark’s head locking loop around the metal ring. Without the security of the lark’s head locking the assembly together, a soft link can come apart because the metal ring can easily slip through the loop. more »

Spotting

For many jumpers, spotting means looking to make sure the green light is on before tossing themselves from the door without so much as a look down to see where they are above the planet. Many seem so trusting of the green light that even if a pilot were to fly five miles out to sea and turn it on, it’s likely they would just blindly bail out and go for a swim. Thankfully, our jump pilots are not that cruel. more »

2017 Instructor Examiner Standardization Meetings

In 2015, USPA conducted four AFF Standardization Meetings at various locations across the United States, plus a fifth meeting in Poland. USPA requires all AFF Instructor Examiners to attend one of these meetings every two years. That same year, USPA also participated in five Tandem Instructor Examiner Standardization Meetings organized by United Parachute Technologies, and all UPT Tandem Instructor Examiners were required to attend one of the meetings. Both the AFF and tandem meetings were well received and successful, so USPA elected to make the tandem meeting a requirement for all USPA Tandem IEs in 2017. more »

Profile - Jessie Farrington | D-6853

by Brian Giboney

Jessie Farrington, D-6853, served on the USPA Board as a regional director for many years and has a long history in the sport. She is part of a large family of skydivers. Her father, Lenny Aikins, got her started in 1964. She has owned Kapowsin Air Sports in Shelton, Washington, with her husband, Geoff, for decades. Her children, Andy Farrington and Keri Bell, are extremely talented skydivers who made many jumps while still in the womb. And her brother, nieces and nephews are all skydivers, and a fourth generation is on the way. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Linda Kretzler

I grew up a skinny little girl who was afraid of everything. My father, who had been an aerial photographer in World War II, encouraged me to try whatever I set my mind to. On the other hand, my mother kept telling me I was too small and a girl and couldn’t do anything.

In spite of this paradox in upbringing, I must have been born with the taste of pixie dust in my mouth, because all I wanted to do was fly. I watched the TV show “Ripcord” as a child and thought I could do it, like the little engine that could. After all, my heroes Mighty Mouse, Peter Pan and Superman could fly. more »

On the Web

 

Facebook Twitter
Youtube RSS

Staff

Ed Scott
Publisher

Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
Managing Editor

Colby Walls
Graphic Designer

Contact Us

Join!