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Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

B.J. Worth did not just influence the sport of skydiving, he defined an era. His thumbprint appears on most of the significant developments from the 1970s through the last decade. more »

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

If you’re squaring up to the requirements for your D license, there’s a good possibility that those jumps are causing a bit of nail-biting. Steve Woodford is here to tell you not to worry. more »

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Greg was a typical young parachutist with a great sense of humor who loved to joke with his fellow jumpers. But when it came to skydiving, he was quiet and deadly serious. more »

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

It’s great that jumpers are finally catching up to what the pioneers were doing 16 years ago, but with so much freefall traffic and so many people trying new things, it’s essential for everyone to learn how to be safe so we can keep on playing. more »

Gearing Up - February 2011

EdScott

The year 2010 ended with 21 U.S. skydiving fatalities, 70 percent of which were canopy related (meaning the jumper successfully deployed a parachute but did not survive the landing). Earlier this year, USPA decided to gather industry experts for a Canopy Safety Summit (see page 23 for participants) and created a web page to solicit ideas and comments from all sources for consideration by the group. more »

Why You Shouldn’t Leave Your Rig in the Trunk of Your Car

A jumper left his rig in the trunk of his car for a few months before giving it to his rigger for a reserve repack. During the inspection, the rigger discovered that a stow band had melted to the grommet on the main deployment bag. As the photo shows, it took quite a bit force to break the stow band and allow the deployment bag to open fully. The melted stow band was a black rubber band from an unknown source. There have been similar cases reported in the past of black rubber bands melting and sticking to grommets or even disintegrating into small pieces. This may be caused by a chemical reaction between the rubber band and grommet or by the heat generated in the trunk of a car. more »

Making Sure a Used Rig Fits

Q:

 

I want to buy a used rig from an internet site, but I’m not sure it will fit. How can I find out before I ask the seller to ship it, and can the size of the harness be adjusted? more »

Choosing the Correct Canopies for Your Students

There are many variables to consider when deciding what size canopy a student should jump. Years ago, this was not really an issue—every student jumped a 300-square-foot canopy, and instructors didn’t need to make a choice. But while larger canopies allowed for soft landings (at least in most cases), the very low wing loadings meant that even the slightest amount of wind caused students to fly backward. In those days, it was not unusual for students to back into trees, power lines or other landing hazards. more »

Hypoxia: Impending Judgment on Reaction Times

The Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) set the requirements for the use of oxygen while on aircraft in Section 91.211 of the FAA’s General Operating and Flight Rules. The section applies to pilots and passengers, including skydivers, even though there is no mention of oxygen use in the more familiar Part 105, Parachute Operations. Jump pilots are required to use supplemental oxygen above 14,000 feet mean sea level (MSL), and supplemental oxygen must be provided to each skydiver when the aircraft is above 15,000 feet MSL. The USPA Basic Safety Requirements also mandate the use of supplemental oxygen for skydives above 15,000 feet MSL. more »

Thinking on your Feet—Improving Your Sit-Fly

photography by Brianne Thompson

Whether you are just learning to sit-fly or have simply hit a plateau in your learning curve, fine-tuning your basic head-up body position is worth the time. Many jumpers, even those for whom sit-flying initially came easily, find themselves stuck in place or unstable if they try to move from a neutral position to drive forward or take a dock. This article explains the basic mechanics of the sit orientation and offers solutions to common problems. more »

Profile - Kamuran "Sonic" Bayrasli | D-21394

by Brian Giboney

PROFILE20111Kamuran “Sonic” Bayrasli, D-21394, started skydiving in 1992 after watching ESPN coverage of the then-current world record 200-way formation. He is now a USPA AFF and Tandem Instructor, PRO-rating holder and Safety & Training Advisor. Bayrasli is also active in swoop competitions and aerial photography and videography. In addition, he’s an FAA Master Rigger who owns The Ranch PROShop, the gear store and rigging loft at Skydive The Ranch in Gardiner, New York; and Ulster County Containers & Canopies (UC3), a BASE-gear company that sells gear approved by the FAA for skydiving. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Chad Christian

HSCML20111

by Chad Christian | B-34226 | Houston, Texas

In August of 2008, I was diagnosed with stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The doctors and other medical center staff told me that I had about six months to live and that treatment was not an option. Being the fighter that I am, I told them they were insane and that I would go broke getting treatments before I would allow myself to die. One year later, I was in remission. I felt that life had just flashed before my eyes. I proved, not only to the doctors but to my friends and family, that I had the will to succeed and would do anything in my power to make the most of life. more »

Gearing Up - January 2011

EdScott

Age is just a number until put into context (ask any of the members of Skydivers Over Sixty). Organizations age too, and this year on July 10, USPA turns 65. That was the date in 1946 that the National Parachute Jumpers-Rigger, Inc., was incorporated in New York (though the organization had already existed for a number of years as the unincorporated National Parachute Jumper’s Association). By 1957, when the organization became the Parachute Club of America (PCA), there were 354 members, which quickly grew to 6,658 by 1962. By 1968, when PCA changed its name again—this time to the United States Parachute Association—membership was at 9,950. Today membership stands at 33,050, and no, we’re not contemplating a name change. more »

Line Wear

Q:

 

When should I replace my lines? more »

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Ed Scott
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