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Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

B.J. Worth did not just influence the sport of skydiving, he defined an era. His thumbprint appears on most of the significant developments from the 1970s through the last decade. more »

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

If you’re squaring up to the requirements for your D license, there’s a good possibility that those jumps are causing a bit of nail-biting. Steve Woodford is here to tell you not to worry. more »

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Greg was a typical young parachutist with a great sense of humor who loved to joke with his fellow jumpers. But when it came to skydiving, he was quiet and deadly serious. more »

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

It’s great that jumpers are finally catching up to what the pioneers were doing 16 years ago, but with so much freefall traffic and so many people trying new things, it’s essential for everyone to learn how to be safe so we can keep on playing. more »

Loose Brake Line and Locked Toggles

When excess steering line came loose from the keepers on one of a jumper’s risers during an otherwise-normal deployment, he inadvertently reached through the loop of excess line when he grabbed his toggle to release his brakes. When he pulled the toggle, it locked the steering line to the riser as shown in the photo. When he discovered that he could not steer or flare his canopy well, the jumper cut away and landed safely under his reserve. Jumpers should use caution when packing to make sure they stow the excess steering line securely. They should also make sure that their toggles are clear of any excess steering line when they release their brakes. more »

Closing the Gap

A jumper who recently received a USPA A license stated that he wished he had learned the functions of the front and rear risers in detail, how to avoid canopy collisions, the appropriate times to disconnect a reserve static line (RSL), the best way to get back to the airport from a long spot and how he should flare his canopy during low-wind landings. If his instructors had trained this jumper properly, wouldn’t he already know this stuff? Yet somehow, his instructors still signed him off to receive his USPA A license. It is sad that some drop zones continue to provide student training that leaves so many gaps in skills and knowledge. more »

Letter to Santa

Dear Santa,

I have been good this year (for the most part anyway), so here is my wish list. It’s pretty long, but every item is really important. more »

Learning to Spot in a GPS World

The Skydiver’s Information Manual (SIM) defines spotting as “selecting the correct ground reference over which to leave the aircraft, selecting the course for the aircraft to fly and directing the pilot on jump run to that point.” For better or worse, the modern-day GPS (global positioning system) device found in nearly every jump airplane today has changed the way most jumpers spot. The pilot now largely handles what used to be a manual process that a skydiver performed on every load. more »

Landing Patterns: A Call to Action

The winter boogie season is upon us, and many of us are starting to count down to when we’ll take that road trip to warmer weather. We are thinking about packing lists, specialty jumps, good friends from distant places and costume parties galore, but in all this preparation, how many people are thinking about the more challenging aspects of boogies? Canopy-related incidents are on the rise in our sport, and boogies—with their unfamiliar environments and lots of canopy traffic—tend to create the kind of situation in which canopy accidents happen. more »

Profile - Brianne Thompson | D-30035

by Brian Giboney

PROFILE201012Brianne Thompson is a professional skydiver, a member of 2010 U.S. Women’s 4-way Skydiving Team Spaceland Blue, co-founder of AXIS Flight School and a wind tunnel coach. Thompson has competed in formation skydiving at several world championships, earning bronze in Russia in 2010 and silver in France in 2008. She has also competed in seven USPA Nationals, adding more medals to her trophy case. Expect Thompson to be a force at future competitions. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Kevin Yasuda

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by Kevin “Yoshi” Yasuda | D-26770 | Houston, Texas

One of the first things I tell people when they ask me about skydiving is that it goes from being an experience to a hobby to a lifestyle, and those of us who are licensed jumpers can attest to the gravity of that statement (pun intended). more »

Gearing Up - December 2010

EdScott

September 16, 2008, will stand as a seminal date in skydiving. That was the date of a public hearing by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) on its “Special Investigation Report on the Safety of Parachute Jump Operations.” The report catalogued a 27-year history of 32 fatal jump plane accidents, many due to faulty maintenance and poor pilot training and decision-making. In fact, the report noted three “recurring safety issues”: more »

Check Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself

Whether you are making your first jump or your 10,000th, flying on your belly or standing on your head, you must rely on your equipment for you to survive jumping from an airplane. So, if equipment is such a critical part of survival, doesn’t it make sense to make sure yours is ready for you to jump before every single skydive? more »

Teaching by Example

As an instructor, you need to ask yourself whether you are setting a good example with your canopy piloting. While hanging around the drop zone waiting to jump, students will often watch canopies landing. It doesn’t make much sense to tell them that they must fly an established landing pattern when you fly your own canopy like an out-of-control moron. Canopy collisions are a big problem and have caused many fatalities over the last decade, so it only makes sense to show students what a good pattern looks like by demonstrating the correct procedure during your own landings. more »

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Ed Scott
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