99 Problems, But The Wind Ain’t One

99 Problems, But The Wind Ain’t One

Given that wind conditions change constantly, being able to properly read and compensate for them is an important skill set for students and competition pilots alike.  more »

Finding the FLOW

Finding the FLOW

What Four High-Profile Accidents Can Teach Us About Finding the Ideal Mental State for Survival more »

Practical Tips for Cloud Clearance

Practical Tips for Cloud Clearance

Most jumpers have a difficult time remembering the cloud clearance regulations, but understanding the reasons for the different altitude requirements can help you remember the necessary information. more »

Winter is Coming

Winter is Coming

Winter comes for all of us, whether you’re of the Great House of Chicagoland or the Great House of Perris. While the season’s arrival clearly hits the Lords of the North hardest, every skydiver in the 50 Kingdoms needs to maintain at least some awareness of cold-season strategy. more »

Profile - Kamuran "Sonic" Bayrasli | D-21394

by Brian Giboney

PROFILE20111Kamuran “Sonic” Bayrasli, D-21394, started skydiving in 1992 after watching ESPN coverage of the then-current world record 200-way formation. He is now a USPA AFF and Tandem Instructor, PRO-rating holder and Safety & Training Advisor. Bayrasli is also active in swoop competitions and aerial photography and videography. In addition, he’s an FAA Master Rigger who owns The Ranch PROShop, the gear store and rigging loft at Skydive The Ranch in Gardiner, New York; and Ulster County Containers & Canopies (UC3), a BASE-gear company that sells gear approved by the FAA for skydiving. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Chad Christian


by Chad Christian | B-34226 | Houston, Texas

In August of 2008, I was diagnosed with stage IV non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The doctors and other medical center staff told me that I had about six months to live and that treatment was not an option. Being the fighter that I am, I told them they were insane and that I would go broke getting treatments before I would allow myself to die. One year later, I was in remission. I felt that life had just flashed before my eyes. I proved, not only to the doctors but to my friends and family, that I had the will to succeed and would do anything in my power to make the most of life. more »

Gearing Up - January 2011


Age is just a number until put into context (ask any of the members of Skydivers Over Sixty). Organizations age too, and this year on July 10, USPA turns 65. That was the date in 1946 that the National Parachute Jumpers-Rigger, Inc., was incorporated in New York (though the organization had already existed for a number of years as the unincorporated National Parachute Jumper’s Association). By 1957, when the organization became the Parachute Club of America (PCA), there were 354 members, which quickly grew to 6,658 by 1962. By 1968, when PCA changed its name again—this time to the United States Parachute Association—membership was at 9,950. Today membership stands at 33,050, and no, we’re not contemplating a name change. more »

Line Wear



When should I replace my lines? more »

Loose Brake Line and Locked Toggles

When excess steering line came loose from the keepers on one of a jumper’s risers during an otherwise-normal deployment, he inadvertently reached through the loop of excess line when he grabbed his toggle to release his brakes. When he pulled the toggle, it locked the steering line to the riser as shown in the photo. When he discovered that he could not steer or flare his canopy well, the jumper cut away and landed safely under his reserve. Jumpers should use caution when packing to make sure they stow the excess steering line securely. They should also make sure that their toggles are clear of any excess steering line when they release their brakes. more »

Closing the Gap

A jumper who recently received a USPA A license stated that he wished he had learned the functions of the front and rear risers in detail, how to avoid canopy collisions, the appropriate times to disconnect a reserve static line (RSL), the best way to get back to the airport from a long spot and how he should flare his canopy during low-wind landings. If his instructors had trained this jumper properly, wouldn’t he already know this stuff? Yet somehow, his instructors still signed him off to receive his USPA A license. It is sad that some drop zones continue to provide student training that leaves so many gaps in skills and knowledge. more »

Letter to Santa

Dear Santa,

I have been good this year (for the most part anyway), so here is my wish list. It’s pretty long, but every item is really important. more »

Learning to Spot in a GPS World

The Skydiver’s Information Manual (SIM) defines spotting as “selecting the correct ground reference over which to leave the aircraft, selecting the course for the aircraft to fly and directing the pilot on jump run to that point.” For better or worse, the modern-day GPS (global positioning system) device found in nearly every jump airplane today has changed the way most jumpers spot. The pilot now largely handles what used to be a manual process that a skydiver performed on every load. more »

Landing Patterns: A Call to Action

The winter boogie season is upon us, and many of us are starting to count down to when we’ll take that road trip to warmer weather. We are thinking about packing lists, specialty jumps, good friends from distant places and costume parties galore, but in all this preparation, how many people are thinking about the more challenging aspects of boogies? Canopy-related incidents are on the rise in our sport, and boogies—with their unfamiliar environments and lots of canopy traffic—tend to create the kind of situation in which canopy accidents happen. more »

Profile - Brianne Thompson | D-30035

by Brian Giboney

PROFILE201012Brianne Thompson is a professional skydiver, a member of 2010 U.S. Women’s 4-way Skydiving Team Spaceland Blue, co-founder of AXIS Flight School and a wind tunnel coach. Thompson has competed in formation skydiving at several world championships, earning bronze in Russia in 2010 and silver in France in 2008. She has also competed in seven USPA Nationals, adding more medals to her trophy case. Expect Thompson to be a force at future competitions. more »

On the Web


Facebook Twitter
Youtube RSS


Ed Scott

Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
Managing Editor

Colby Walls
Graphic Designer

Contact Us