Canopy Control

Braked Canopy Flight

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructors Brianne Thompson and Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. For more information visit axisflightschool.com. more »

Relative Glide

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Illustrations by Niklas Daniel. For more information visit axisflightschool.com. more »

When Less is More

Around the drop zone, you’ll hear jumpers referring to minimum-altitude-loss turns by a variety of names: flat turns, braked turns, elevation turns or depression turns. The intention behind making all these types of turns is the same, namely, to perform a necessary heading change with the smallest amount of altitude loss possible. Technically speaking, the aim is to achieve the primary effect of yaw (heading change) with minimal roll (bank) and pitch (nose-attitude) change, while controlling any resulting effect (surge). more »

Windy-Day Tips

Springtime weather often means windy weather, and while skydivers are often grounded when the winds are too strong or gusty, there are plenty of days when the wind picks up but remains at a reasonable level and we can continue to jump. However, we have to stay sharp and pay attention, especially under canopy. more »

Foundations of Flight—Rear-Riser Stall

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. more »

The Downsizing Checklist

Safety & Training Advisors spend a considerable amount of time telling people they shouldn’t be loading their canopies so heavily. But 90 percent of the time, jumpers don’t listen. Skydivers can have a bit of an ego, and many simply hear, “I think you’re a crappy canopy pilot who can’t handle a smaller wing.” So they downsize anyway and break their legs, backs and pelvises with some regularity. more »

Confessions of a Canopy Coach

Exiting from 5,000 feet, Stuart Schoenfeld clears the aircraft and pitches his pilot chute. After checking his canopy, he pulls his leg straps down to his thighs and pulls his chest strap loose until it reaches the very end. more »

Landing Patterns: A Call to Action

The winter boogie season is upon us, and many of us are starting to count down to when we’ll take that road trip to warmer weather. We are thinking about packing lists, specialty jumps, good friends from distant places and costume parties galore, but in all this preparation, how many people are thinking about the more challenging aspects of boogies? Canopy-related incidents are on the rise in our sport, and boogies—with their unfamiliar environments and lots of canopy traffic—tend to create the kind of situation in which canopy accidents happen. more »