February 2010

February 2010

February 2010
photo by Ori Kuper
C-35707
Team VTSD exits the Otter on their way to winning gold in the 4-way formation skydiving open category during the USPA National Collegiate Parachuting Championships held at Skydive Spaceland in Rosharon, Texas. (Look for complete coverage of the USPA Collegiates in the March issue of Parachutist.)

February 2010 | Volume 51, Number 2 | Issue 604 more »

Where to Repair?

Q:
When I need to get my rig repaired, who should fix it? more »

Reacting to a Canopy Collision

Unless you are a jumper who has some canopy formation skydiving experience, you may not have given much thought about what you should do if you are ever involved in a canopy collision. Knowing what to do, and reacting correctly to the situation, just might save your life and the life of the other jumper involved. more »

Snag Hazards

This jumper snagged the bottom of one of his jumpsuit booties while exiting from the step of a Cessna 182 aircraft. There have been several similar jumper-Cessna hang-ups in the past, in which jumpers were left hanging from one of their booties after letting go of the plane. In at least one case, the airplane landed while still trailing the jumper because the jumper could not be freed from the step. In this case, the pilot, Matt Camardo, was able to cut the jumper free of the step because he had a knife available. The jumper then fell from the aircraft and had an otherwise uneventful skydive. Every aircraft, particularly ones that have a step such as the Cessna 182 and 206 models, should include a sturdy knife that the pilot can access for situations like this one. Jumpers exiting from the step of a Cessna should use extra caution with their foot placement to avoid this type of problem. more »

Skydiving Skills, Learning and Sleep

Are you staying up late studying the Skydiver’s Information Manual or Instructor’s Rating Manual for a rating examination? Or staying at the DZ to do a couple more practice jumps, even though you’re exhausted? more »

Climb Out, Freak Out, Chill Out—A Guide to Filming 4-way

This article is for jumpers who already have some experience flying camera and are trying to expand on their knowledge of how to film formation teams in a competition setting. I will focus mainly on 4-way, because I believe it to be the most difficult FS discipline to film (aside from VFS), due to the many different exits and faster key speeds. However, once you have a firm grasp of shooting 4-way, the same principles can be applied to 8-way and larger formations. more »

Point Break—20 Years Later

photos courtesy of Tom Sanders/ Aerial Focus

The filming of “Point Break” began in early 1990; the movie opened the summer of the following year to mostly positive reviews and left the audience hungry for more skydiving. Never mind that some critics, such as Owen Gleiberman from Entertainment Weekly, mused, “’Point Break’ makes those of us who don't spend our lives searching for the ultimate physical rush feel like second-class citizens. The film turns reckless athletic valor into a new form of aristocracy." Well, everyone is entitled to their opinion, but for many people, the speedstar over Lake Powell touched their souls and made them want to jump out of planes. Ultimately, “Point Break,” starring Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves, ushered in a new era for the sport of skydiving. more »

Gearing Up - February 2010

In 1962, USPA’s forerunner, the Parachute Club of America (PCA), was garnering the results of its two principle efforts—promoting skydiving and working for skydiving’s acceptance by government agencies. Only five years earlier, the organization had changed its name from the National Parachute Jumpers and Riggers, Inc. and changed its constitution to move away from commercial promotion of exhibition skydiving to become an individual membership organization of recreational skydivers. The PCA ended 1958 with 807 members; it ended 1962 with 6,800 members. But another number increased as well: Parachutist reported five fatalities “in the 24 months of 1959 and 1960,” but 1962 alone had 19 reported fatalities. more »

Profile - Brian Giboney | D-21070

by Brian Giboney

PROFILE20102Brian Giboney wrote his first “Profile” column for the February 1999 edition of Parachutist, and he hasn’t slowed down since. Since that first piece (which profiled Eric Fradet) came out, he has been by far the magazine’s most reliable contributor—producing 12 installments a year for 10 years now. In this, Parachutist’s 121st “Profile,” the tables are turned. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Mark Perry

 

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by Mark Perry | C-37171 | Naples, Florida

I began this wild and wonderful sport of skydiving like most, by taking a trip to the local DZ on a dare; I experienced the thrill of freefall with a tandem jump. A month later, I made one more tandem and was hooked. My good friend, Angel, and I decided to continue the thrill and step it up a notch by wearing our own rigs. After a year of AFF and accumulating enough jumps, we were skydivers! I felt confident enough in my skydiving skills to invite my wife, Debbie, and son, Nick, to visit the DZ and share in my enthusiasm for the sport. Debbie had no interest in skydiving, but out of her love for me she wanted to be there to support my new hobby. At the end of the day, and after witnessing one of my less glamorous landings, she turned to me and said, “Are you sure this sport is right for you?” I assured her that skydiving is safe and told her that I would get better at my landings with a little more practice. Nick thought that his old man was just going through a phase and the hobby wouldn’t last. more »