February 2017

February 2017

February 2017
photo by Willy Boeykens | USPA #10569
Phoenix-Fly team Need 4 Speed builds a formation during its five-day artistic wingsuit flying event at the Skydive Dubai Desert Campus in the United Arab Emirates.

Features

Earning the Women's Head-Down World Record by Jessica Brownlow
The Next Big Thing—Mixed Formation Skydiving is Ready to Take Over the World by Annette O'Neil more »

Up is the New Down

Remember the days when it seemed like all everyone wanted to do was learn to fly head down so they could join the cool kids on jumps? Well, the cool kids have flipped it right side up and stepped it up a notch. Head-up angle jumps and sit-flying formations seem to be spreading like dust devils in the Arizona summer. And big-way head-up jumps are becoming more popular than ever. more »

The Next Big Thing

Andy Malchiodi—neck deep in his multi-hyphenate (medalist-coach-musician-filmmaker) life—didn’t set out to co-invent a skydiving discipline. He just wanted to enjoy competition. Luckily for us, he did it anyway. He’s quick to refuse to take credit for being the first person to combine flat and vertical orientations into one discipline, but there’s no denying that he’s the one who has done the most to make it official.

more »

Profile - Lewis "Lew" Sanborn | D-1

by Brian Giboney

Lewis “Lew” Sanborn, D-1, has been skydiving for 67 years. He and Jacques André Istel, D-2, established sport skydiving in the United States in the 1950s. Sanborn started jumping with the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division and later became a member of the U.S. Parachute Team, master rigger, private and commercial pilot, instructor, national judge and world-record holder. He devised a technique for freefall photography and shot a cover photo for Sports Illustrated. In 1960, he was even nominated for an Academy Award for filming the skydiving documentary “A Sport is Born.” In 1972, USPA honored him with its Lifetime Achievement Award “for originating safe and reliable parachuting equipment and pioneering work in freefall photography.” In 2000, Istel inducted him into the Hall of Fame of Parachuting in Felicity, California. In 2001, the Golden Knights made him an honorary member, and in 2010, the International Skydiving Museum inducted him into its Hall of Fame. . more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Marcela Gallardo

“Skydiving changed my life.” I´m sure this is an overused phrase. However, I believe I have valid arguments to use it. Should I tell you my story?
My name is Marcela Gallardo; I’m a 42-year-old woman, mother of three daughters, wife and grandmother. I live in Neuquen City, Argentina, and it’s been two years now since my first tandem jump.
more »

The Great Shoe Jump

Everyone loses something now and again: a sock, an earring, a dog, a heart. Sometimes, these things are found easily: a dollar in the laundry, that favorite pen, a homeless beagle. I used to blame it on poltergeists and a mischievous husband. As age rolls in, I hesitate to blame anything else.
But now the blame can be laid on the winds ... at 10,000 feet:

  more »

Head Up Side Slides

 

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photo by David Cherry. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Container Lock

A jumper experienced a pilot-chute-in-tow malfunction after the stitching that held the main closing pin to the bridle failed. Consequently, the main closing pin remained in place after the pilot chute inflated. The jumper performed emergency procedures and landed uneventfully under the reserve parachute. To avoid this situation, frequently inspect your main bridle's pin-attachment point to ensure that the stitching and webbing are in airworthy condition.

Demonstrating Good Sense

Skydivers have to demonstrate a variety of skills and knowledge to earn the USPA PRO rating, which many of the public demonstration jumps conducted around the country each year require. Jumpers must train to jump with smoke and flags, learn to file a request for authorization with the local Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office, complete 10 accuracy jumps and demonstrate proficiency in many other ways. But one of the most important attributes that every PRO jumper must have is not on the test: knowing when to say no and call off a demo jump. more »

Christmas Cameras

So Santa dropped a shiny new GoPro under the tree, and you are just dying to start jumping with it, right? Well, dying to jump with it could literally be the case, so be sure you are ready for the added challenges before you slap that thing on your helmet on the first warm day of the season. Jumping with a video camera involves challenges, many of which are not obvious to those who decide to start jumping with one. USPA recommends that anyone jumping with a camera hold at least a USPA C license (200 jumps), but jump numbers are not the only consideration. Before you start, check out Section 6-8 of the Skydiver’s Information Manual, which includes lots of helpful information. more »