Instructional

When Less is More

Around the drop zone, you’ll hear jumpers referring to minimum-altitude-loss turns by a variety of names: flat turns, braked turns, elevation turns or depression turns. The intention behind making all these types of turns is the same, namely, to perform a necessary heading change with the smallest amount of altitude loss possible. Technically speaking, the aim is to achieve the primary effect of yaw (heading change) with minimal roll (bank) and pitch (nose-attitude) change, while controlling any resulting effect (surge). more »

Exiting an Open Accordion

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Brianne Thompson at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Assistance provided by Sandy Radsek and Kim Winslow of Arizona Overdrive. Air photos by Niklas Daniel; ground photos by Mark Kirschenbaum. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Backward Movement—Belly Flying

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Brianne Thompson at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Back-Fly to Sit-Fly Transition

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Brianne Thompson. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Head-Down In-Facing Carving

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructor Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Steve Curtis. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Spinning a Sidebody Piece Backward

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Brought to you by AXIS Flight School Instructors Brianne Thompson and Niklas Daniel at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Travis Mills. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Foundations of Flight—Back Tracking

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Brought to you by Instructor Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Dropping In after Dropping Out

There are legions of retired and semi-retired skydivers who haven’t been upstairs in weeks, months or even years but suddenly get the urge to strap on their gear and head out to the DZ. Sometimes the returnees are students or novices who simply ran out of money during their initial training, but increasingly frequently they're licensed skydivers with considerable experience who were sidetracked for years by a demanding job or too many kids’ soccer games. For them, it may take only a whiff of jet A on a sunny summer day to get their skydiving juices flowing again. more »

Foundations of Flight—Sit-to-Sit Front-Flip Transition

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Brought to you by Niklas Daniel of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Brianne Thompson. For more information visit axisflightschool.com or search “Axis Flight School” on Facebook. more »

Back-Fly

Learning to back-fly is often the first step a jumper takes when learning to freefly, whether in the air or wind tunnel. The back-flying position offers incredible versatility in flying speeds and gives a jumper the ability to fly with anyone from belly to head-down flyers. This versatility also makes it an excellent recovery position when learning to fly in positions such as the sit, stand or head down, since the flyer is able to “fall off” the position without rapid deceleration (called “corking”), which is hazardous to others nearby and must be avoided. more »