Instructional

AFF - Category B

Tag: AFF, Instructional, Videos

Category B of the Accelerated Freefall Training. more »

AFF - Category A

Tag: AFF, Instructional, Videos

Category A of the Accelerated Freefall Training. more »

Thinking on your Feet—Improving Your Sit-Fly

photography by Brianne Thompson

Whether you are just learning to sit-fly or have simply hit a plateau in your learning curve, fine-tuning your basic head-up body position is worth the time. Many jumpers, even those for whom sit-flying initially came easily, find themselves stuck in place or unstable if they try to move from a neutral position to drive forward or take a dock. This article explains the basic mechanics of the sit orientation and offers solutions to common problems. more »

Learning to Spot in a GPS World

The Skydiver’s Information Manual (SIM) defines spotting as “selecting the correct ground reference over which to leave the aircraft, selecting the course for the aircraft to fly and directing the pilot on jump run to that point.” For better or worse, the modern-day GPS (global positioning system) device found in nearly every jump airplane today has changed the way most jumpers spot. The pilot now largely handles what used to be a manual process that a skydiver performed on every load. more »

Landing Patterns: A Call to Action

The winter boogie season is upon us, and many of us are starting to count down to when we’ll take that road trip to warmer weather. We are thinking about packing lists, specialty jumps, good friends from distant places and costume parties galore, but in all this preparation, how many people are thinking about the more challenging aspects of boogies? Canopy-related incidents are on the rise in our sport, and boogies—with their unfamiliar environments and lots of canopy traffic—tend to create the kind of situation in which canopy accidents happen. more »

Tracking—Theory and Application

photos by Niklas Daniel

Tracking is an area that jumpers, regardless of skill level, need to continually practice and improve. Even those who have made thousands of skydives often need to go back and hone the basics, since many will have formed inefficient habits over the years. more »

Wave of the Future—Building an 8-Way VFS Dive Pool

with contributions from Mike Wittenburg and photos by Adam Tippie

Ten years ago, finding enough flyers capable of forming an 8-way head-down round was challenging. Multi-point formations of this size were even rarer, and most vertical formation skydiving (VFS) organizers concentrated on achieving a single point. Since then, skydiving has evolved. Freeflying and VFS are becoming more popular at drop zones around the world, and it looks like 8-way VFS may be the next challenge on the horizon. more »

Building Castles in the Air—An Overview of Canopy Formation

Canopy formation (CF) skydiving, also known as canopy relative work (CRW or “crew”), is a discipline of technical ability that is largely misunderstood. Some perceive the discipline as being extremely dangerous, but the small, dedicated group of jumpers who practice it are rewarded by becoming better, safer canopy pilots. CF jumpers generally channel their interest in one of two directions: recreational CF (which includes parabatics) or competition. CF is also the only remaining discipline for which USPA offers performance-based awards—the 4-Stack, 8-Stack and Canopy Crest Soloist (for docking eighth or later on a formation) Awards. more »

How to Teach Your Brain to Skydive

You may not realize it, but you probably spend a lot of time teaching your brain how to skydive. Dirt dives, creeper practice and touching emergency handles on the ride to altitude are some of the ways we train our brains to direct our bodies what to do while jumping. Since performance is only as good as the training we give our brains, knowing a little about how the brain learns might improve our skydiving. more »

Climb Out, Freak Out, Chill Out—A Guide to Filming 4-way

This article is for jumpers who already have some experience flying camera and are trying to expand on their knowledge of how to film formation teams in a competition setting. I will focus mainly on 4-way, because I believe it to be the most difficult FS discipline to film (aside from VFS), due to the many different exits and faster key speeds. However, once you have a firm grasp of shooting 4-way, the same principles can be applied to 8-way and larger formations. more »