Once Upon a Time There Was a Movie Called “The Gypsy Moths”

In 1964, I launched my magazine, DZ-USA, to promote the sport and contribute something other than doomsday predictions at a time when the man on the street viewed a parachutist as a daredevil looking for a place to die. In that same year, I was invited to appear on “The Joey Bishop Show” in Hollywood to represent the sport. There, I met John Frankenheimer, who was promoting his move “Grand Prix,” and Lyle Cameron, who produced Skydiver magazine. John was very interested in what Lyle and I had to say about the sport. He stated that he’d always wanted to make a movie about it and would contact us if a future project came up. more »

A Long Night in a Swamp

As a SoCal jumper, I don't have to worry that much about landing in trees or anything green. So I took seriously memorizing the DZ's aerial photo (the kind all DZs have hanging near manifest) when I went jumping in Maine. I knew where all the tree groves were, along with power lines, ditches and other obstructions. After a couple of jumps, I got comfy with the landing pattern, and I felt I knew my way around.

Around sunset, some good-sized cumulus clouds showed up, and I decided a hop-and-pop at 12,500 feet would give me some good photo opportunities. The view was indeed spectacular, and every minute or so, I would glance at the DZ to make sure I could get back. more »

15 Minutes of Fame

Fifteen minutes of fame. Everybody will have it once. I had mine in 1987 because I saved a life while skydiving.

Andy Warhol, the iconic 1960s American artist, is credited with the creation of the concept. This was long before the internet and YouTube. Back then, a person’s 15 minutes of fame depended on newspapers, a few broadcast TV channels and magazines. But even with the lack of today’s instantaneously streaming video, some events caught the attention of publishers and found their way to the public in a firestorm of media attention. more »

Stranger (DZ) Danger

At the 2015 Turkey Meet at Skydive City Zephyrhills in Florida, my canopy collapsed at 20 feet as I was coming in on final. I broke the fibula at my left ankle and dislocated and fractured my tibia. The abrupt plunge also caused intense fear and anxiety about skydiving. Mechanical turbulence caused the accident: I landed close to the hangar and the wind rolling over it and into the landing area collapsed my parachute. more »

The Cheststrap

It was the seventh jump of the day for our newly formed and unnamed 4-way formation skydiving team. A normal jump on a normal training day. It was the scariest jump I’ve ever been on.

I check gear. All the time. I find things: incorrectly assembled 3-rings, unhooked or misrouted reserve-static-line lanyards and visors up on exit. And I check chest straps. I’ve caught tons of misrouted and dangling chest straps in the loading area and on the airplane. But I missed this one. more »

The Great Shoe Jump

Everyone loses something now and again: a sock, an earring, a dog, a heart. Sometimes, these things are found easily: a dollar in the laundry, that favorite pen, a homeless beagle. I used to blame it on poltergeists and a mischievous husband. As age rolls in, I hesitate to blame anything else.
But now the blame can be laid on the winds ... at 10,000 feet:

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Just a Fun Story About My 1,000th Skydive

Back in 2013, I got my skydiving license through the U.S. Army Golden Knights and then attended the Golden Knight Assessment and Selection Program, where I hit 100 jumps. I didn't make it that year. For crying out loud, I had only 35 jumps when I went! I nearly killed myself and never had a clue. Good on them for cutting me! more »

Tales from the Bonfire - Crab Walk

My experience happened on my 28th jump, when I was maybe two or three requirements away from achieving my A license. The skies were clear and the winds were about 14 mph. In no way did this jump seem like it was going to be any different from the two others I had successfully completed that day. Everything about the jump went fine and according to plan until the landing. The winds at my airfield, which were usually fairly predictable, shifted and gusted. I hit the ground with my right leg hard enough to fracture my ankle and break my tibia. more »

Tales from the Bonfire - When in Doubt

I was on a hop-and-pop load to 4,500 feet with three other jumpers in a Cessna 182. The exits all went according to normal procedure, and my opening was good. With my slider stowed and steering toggles in hand, I started counting the other parachutes. That's when I picked up on the freebag spiraling in the air out in front of me. Cutaway! more »

Tales from the Bonfire - How NOT to Break a World Record

“Basically, there are only two things you must do on any skydive: pull and flare. In that order. If you forget the first one, don’t worry about the second.” I have occasionally made that facetious statement as a funny way to explain simplifying priorities. But in the sunny skies over Rochelle, Illinois, in June 2013, those priorities were no joke. W hile hurling myself at the planet with a broken right arm, I was challenged to put my own advice to the ultimate test. more »