Just a Fun Story About My 1,000th Skydive

Back in 2013, I got my skydiving license through the U.S. Army Golden Knights and then attended the Golden Knight Assessment and Selection Program, where I hit 100 jumps. I didn't make it that year. For crying out loud, I had only 35 jumps when I went! I nearly killed myself and never had a clue. Good on them for cutting me! more »

Gearing Up - January 2017

EdScott

In 1984, the IRS classified USPA as a 501(c)4 non-profit association. That was based on its finding that USPA’s main purposes “promote the common good and social welfare.” Importantly, 501(c)4 organizations can lobby government officials as long as they meet all lobby registration and lobby reporting rules. And USPA does lobby on behalf of skydiving. What does that mean? Primarily, USPA’s executive director and director of government relations engage in efforts to build relationships with various officials, usually those in the Federal Aviation Administration and the Transportation Security Administration but sometimes other federal and state agencies. more »

Profile - Jason Russell | D-23161

by Brian Giboney

Jason Russell, D-23161, is a world record holder and a newly crowned Vertical Formation Skydiving World Champion with his SDC Core teammates, one of whom is his wife. Early in his career, he left motocross racing to compete in skydiving and now has made more than 14,000 jumps. Chalk this up as a huge gain to our sport. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Melissa Scott

On November 26, 2013, my life as I knew it changed in a matter of seconds. My husband committed suicide in front of me. At that moment, time froze. I was a widow at the age of 33. In an instant, I was left a single mommy of two little girls, one four months old and the other six years old. The next few months flew by in a blur. more »

Tales from the Bonfire - Crab Walk

My experience happened on my 28th jump, when I was maybe two or three requirements away from achieving my A license. The skies were clear and the winds were about 14 mph. In no way did this jump seem like it was going to be any different from the two others I had successfully completed that day. Everything about the jump went fine and according to plan until the landing. The winds at my airfield, which were usually fairly predictable, shifted and gusted. I hit the ground with my right leg hard enough to fracture my ankle and break my tibia. more »

Gearing Up - December 2016

EdScott

Winter’s icy grip doesn’t stop all skydivers, but many do take a break until temperatures rise again. Whether you are jumping or not, you should plan to join hundreds of fellow skydivers, scores of riggers and dozens of parachute and component manufacturers at the February 10-18 series of events tied to the 2017 Parachute Industry Association Symposium in Chattanooga, Tennessee. more »

Profile - Cornelia Mihai | D-31070

by Brian Giboney

Cornelia Mihai, D-31070, is a focused and hard-working skydiver who at the 2014 Fédération Aéronautique Internationale World Championships became the first female to medal in a canopy piloting event. Originally from Romania, Mihai is now a member of the Skydive Dubai Canopy Piloting Team and is regularly atop the podium representing the United Arab Emirates in international canopy piloting competitions. She is also a tandem and AFF instructor. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Kate Wrigley

In November 2011, I started AFF at Skydive the Farm, which is now located in Cedartown, Georgia, and little did I know what a difference that decision was going to make in my life. It started with a rule I made for myself that summer: If it sounded fun, I would try it. more »

Tales from the Bonfire - When in Doubt

I was on a hop-and-pop load to 4,500 feet with three other jumpers in a Cessna 182. The exits all went according to normal procedure, and my opening was good. With my slider stowed and steering toggles in hand, I started counting the other parachutes. That's when I picked up on the freebag spiraling in the air out in front of me. Cutaway! more »

Gearing Up - November 2016

EdScott

Right up there with agricultural aviation, flying skydivers is one of the most demanding non-military aviation jobs. If the weather is good and manifest is busy, the jump pilot can count on working the entire day—sunrise to sunset—eating and hydrating in the airplane and getting few breaks. Load, taxi, takeoff, climb, level, descend, land, taxi and repeat. There is no en-route phase of flight where the pilot can kick back with cruise settings or engage an autopilot. more »