Forgery

You completed all of your license requirements and are ready to send the form to USPA … but wait! You didn’t get the Safety and Training Advisor’s signature on your license application. Bummer. You really want to get that license sent in and processed in time to make those helicopter jumps, but the S&TA is not available. Well, nobody is watching, so you forge the S&TA’s signature and send in the license application. After all, nobody really checks that stuff, right? Wrong. more »

Enjoying the Flight

One of the great things about being a tandem instructor is the longer canopy flight that comes with making tandem jumps. On hot and busy days, it provides a chance to relax in cooler air, breathe deeply and spend a few minutes providing up-close canopy training to the student. It’s also nice to enjoy the clearer airspace and limited canopy traffic for the entire descent. Pulling the drogue release around 5,000 feet leaves a tandem pair with most canopy traffic far below and only other nearby tandem canopies to worry about during the descent. It also provides more time and altitude to deal with any canopy problems. An easy day. more »

Exiting a Half Rebel (MFS Random Formation N)

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Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Aerial photo by Seth Studer. Ground photos by David Arnett. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

RSL Misrouting

During a reserve repack, a Federal Aviation Administration Senior Rigger discovered this misrouted reserve static line on a rig used by the drop zone for student jumps and as a rental. At some point, someone created this routing error by disconnecting the RSL from the riser, passing it under the reserve riser and then reconnecting it to the main riser. more »

Mastering Consistent Landings

Mastering the basics of canopy control is one of the most important aspects of learning to skydive. It is also the skill that usually takes the longest for students and newly licensed jumpers to develop. It is a great feeling for skydiving instructors when a younger jumper finally becomes a great canopy pilot rather than a passenger going for a ride to wherever the canopy happens to be pointing. more »

Smoothing the Paperwork Flow for Your Students

As a general rule, skydiving coaches and instructors have several things in common:

  • Good skydiving skills
  • Good canopy piloting skills
  • Good teaching skills
  • Really, really bad administrative skills

Hey, three out of four ain’t bad! more »

An Intelligent Approach to Technology

A jumper with approximately 100 jumps flew his canopy too far downwind to land in the main landing area. After landing uneventfully in another area of the airport, he explained that he did not turn onto his base leg in time because he was waiting for his audible alarm to beep as his signal.
During a 2-way skydive, a jumper with approximately 500 jumps who planned to deploy at 4,000 feet instead deployed at 2,000 feet. He had been waiting for his audible altimeter to beep but finally realized that he was not wearing his helmet for the skydive, so his audible device was not there.
A jumper with approximately 150 jumps was on an airplane fiddling with his GoPro camera just before exit when another jumper pointed out that his chest strap was not threaded properly through the friction adapter.
A first-jump student did not respond to instructions provided via radio while he was under canopy. After he landed uneventfully, staff discovered that he did not respond to the radio commands because he was busy talking to a friend on his cell phone during his canopy descent. more »

Tandem Emergency Procedures

After the five different tandem instructor examiner standardization meetings (four in the U.S. and one in Europe) that Tom Noonan of United Parachute Technologies conducted for hundreds of examiners in 2015, it became obvious that some examiners had forgotten critical information regarding emergency procedures. Tandem instructors must study and practice emergency procedures to the point where they respond instantly and correctly to every type of malfunction 100 percent of the time, but some of the examiners at the meetings were not at that level. Additionally, a few of the incident reports filed with USPA in the last couple of years show that tandem instructors did not perform emergency procedures correctly when faced with actual emergencies.  more »

Torn Main Canopy Rib

A cell on the left side of this main canopy is deformed due to a large tear in one of the ribs near the tail. When the photographer noticed the bulge in the photo, he researched older photos of the same canopy and found that the problem had worsened over time and started when another jumper owned the canopy five years earlier. The current owner reported that the canopy was prone to opening off heading but never noticed anything else unusual about how it opened and flew in the more than 200 jumps he put on it. Because of the location of the damage and bulge, the jumper couldn’t see the defect when he was packing or flying the canopy. more »

Exiting a Double Spock (MFS Random Formation B)

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Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Aerial photo by Seth Studer. Ground photos by David Arnett. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com.

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