Five Hazardous Attitudes

The aviation world long ago identified five hazardous attitudes that lead to trouble for pilots flying airplanes. The FAA published these findings in chapter 17 of its “Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge” (available as a PDF at faa.gov). These attitudes are also very relevant to skydivers. Jumpers, as well as pilots, can begin to make better decisions by identifying the hazardous attitudes and minimizing them. more »

Preparing for the Coach Course

The USPA Coach Course is USPA’s entry-level instructional course, but in many ways it is more difficult than any of the other instructional rating courses. Much of this is because:

  • Most candidates are new to teaching anything, much less skydiving skills.
  • The evaluation process is a new experience, and it can be intimidating.
  • Many candidates approach the rating with a casual attitude and arrive to the course underprepared.

Maybe Confucius was thinking of the USPA Coach Course when he said, “Success depends upon previous preparation, and without such preparation there is sure to be failure.” more »

Common Sense

Over the 70-plus years of sport skydiving’s evolution, one seeming constant is the unruly reputation of skydivers. The brash, cocky, “to hell with the rules, I’ll do whatever I want” stigma seems to stick with us, no matter what. And sometimes, for good reason. Certain skydivers would rather not follow any rules or guidelines, whether related to skydiving or not. more »

New SIM and IRM

USPA has just released the latest versions of the Skydiver’s Information Manual and Instructional Rating Manual. As in past years, the manuals have a two-year production cycle, which means they are valid for rating courses in 2016 and 2017. Examiners and candidates at any USPA Rating Course that takes place following the release of the manuals must use the new versions. This will eliminate confusion caused by course candidates or examiners using different manuals, especially in coach and tandem courses, since the new manuals contain many changes for those training methods. more »

Rigging Mistake

A newly licensed jumper bought this rig from a private owner over the internet. The gear came with a freshly packed reserve, but when the new owner looked at the rig, he noticed that the reserve closing loop was badly frayed. He brought the gear to a local rigger at his drop zone for inspection, and the rigger noticed that the pin-protector flap of the reserve container was closed incorrectly. The local rigger inspected and repacked the rig to ensure that it had no additional problems. more »

Head-Down Range of Motion Drills

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Range-of-Motion Drills for Back Flyers

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by Niklas Daniel. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Beyond the First Flight: Relative Work

Lightning Flight Logo

By Taya Weiss of the Lightning Flight wingsuit, freefly and angle-flight school at Skydive Perris in California. more »

Spinning Malfunctions

After any given weekend, you’ll hear about several jumpers from around the country who needed to cut away from their rapidly spinning main canopies. You’d think that skydivers would really want to avoid having malfunctions, but with all of the spinning malfunctions occurring recently, it seems that the opposite is true. Amazingly, malfunctions of this type remain a prominent cause of cutaways even though almost all of them are preventable. more »

Packed Correctly for a Cutaway

Q:

 

Is My Rig Set Up and Packed Correctly for a Cutaway? more »