Sunday, November 28, 2021
Menu

 

About Governance

Oversight of skydiving involves multiple entities, most notably including the USPA, and the FAA.

The mission of the Federal Aviation Administration is to provide the safest, most efficient aviation system in the world. They regulate aspects of skydiving and rely on the self-regulation of the participants through the guidelines and recommendations published by USPA. The FAA's main responsibility is to provide for the safety of air traffic, as well as persons and property on the ground. The FAA does this by certificating pilots, mechanics, air traffic controllers and parachute riggers and by requiring approval data for aircraft and parachutes. The agency has the authority to impose fines and suspend or revoke certificates it has issued. In the case of a skydiving violation, the FAA can fine the pilot, rigger, jumpers, as well as suspend or revoke the certificates of pilots and riggers.

The FAA and USPA rely on self-regulation from within the skydiving community for most training and operational requirements.

Latest News From Government Relations

27 Sep 2021

This is a synopsis from the NTSB’s report and does not include the Board’s rationale for the conclusions, probable cause, and safety recommendations. NTSB staff is currently making...

read more...

1 Jan 2016

Studies have shown that startle responses during unexpected situations such as power‐plant failure during takeoff or initial climb have contributed to loss of control of aircraft. By including an...

read more...

8 Dec 2015

USPA has developed a packet that has been mailed to all Group Member DZ operators that helps clarify the federal aviation regulations as they apply to operators of jump aircraft. The USPA Group...

read more...

7 Dec 2015

The USPA Skydiving Aircraft Operations Manual was designed to provide DZOs and their pilots with a guide to procedures and practices that supplement FAA regulatory requirements. The newly revised...

read more...