Wednesday, May 22, 2019

 

About Governance

Oversight of skydiving involves multiple entities, most notably including the USPA, and the FAA.

The mission of the Federal Aviation Administration is to provide the safest, most efficient aviation system in the world. They regulate aspects of skydiving and rely on the self-regulation of the participants through the guidelines and recommendations published by USPA. The FAA's main responsibility is to provide for the safety of air traffic, as well as persons and property on the ground. The FAA does this by certificating pilots, mechanics, air traffic controllers and parachute riggers and by requiring approval data for aircraft and parachutes. The agency has the authority to impose fines and suspend or revoke certificates it has issued. In the case of a skydiving violation, the FAA can fine the pilot, rigger, jumpers, as well as suspend or revoke the certificates of pilots and riggers.

The FAA and USPA rely on self-regulation from within the skydiving community for most training and operational requirements.

Latest News From Government Relations

24 Apr 2019

Orange Skies Free Fall Center launched its opening weekend at Fort Morgan Municipal Airport in Colorado April 20-21.

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1 Apr 2019

During its recent meeting in Dallas, the USPA Board of Directors voted to support a major airport-access win for skydiving by Luther Kurtz, DZO of the Phoenix Skydive Center in Casa Grande, Arizona, under Part 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Kurtz will receive a $24,156.76 as a reimbursement for a share of his legal expenses through the Airport Access and Defense Fund. Details about the case are available in the article “DZO Wins Part 16 Appeal” on page 16 in the February issue of Parachutist.

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1 Jul 2018

The Federal Aviation Administration ruled in favor of a USPA member who sought airport access for his skydiving business in Romeo, Michigan.

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25 Apr 2018

The action calls worked and it now appears that the needed FAA funding bill will pass without changes to the structure of air traffic control. “Once again, we thank our members who made the calls in defense of skydiving’s airspace needs,” said USPA Executive Director Ed Scott.

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