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Wingsuit Deployments Part 2

Wingsuit Deployments Part 2

Advanced Techniques by Matt Gerdes with contributions from Chris Geiler, Will Kitto and Rich Webb. more »

The Seven Keys to Downsizing

The Seven Keys to Downsizing

“The most deadly aspect of skydiving isn’t swooping or wingsuiting or big-ways or collisions or whatever you think it is. It’s lack of patience.” more »

Summer in Seattle

Summer in Seattle

For many who attended the summer USPA Board of Directors meeting July 21-23, Seattle, Washington, offered respite from the oppressive heat blanketing most of the country. Armed with research and member feedback, the directors arrived in the Emerald City ready to tackle difficult topics and ensure the association’s continued success.   more »

The Clouds in Our Heads—On the Lake Erie Tragedy and the False Security of Technology

The Clouds in Our Heads—On the Lake Erie Tragedy and the False Security of Technology

On August 27, 1967, 16 skydivers died on the same load. What has come to be known as “The Lake Erie Tragedy” resulted in more fatalities than any other skydiving-related accident since. This month marks its 50th anniversary. more »

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

If you’re squaring up to the requirements for your D license, there’s a good possibility that those jumps are causing a bit of nail-biting. Steve Woodford—the organizer of many funnel-free, injury-free, collision-free big-way-milestone night jumps—is here to tell you not to worry. more »

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

B reakoff. Greg turned 180 degrees to track from his five teammates. It was a simple 6-way with no contact. Uneventful, yes, but still glorious. Everything about skydiving was glorious. Especially when the jumps were from a C-130 Hercules at 12,500 feet … and it’s your job. more »

Profile - John Bull | D-6450

by Brian Giboney

John Bull’s love for the sport and the community is contagious. Bull made his first jump in 1978, and in 1981 he became a member of the Air Trash brotherhood of skydivers, to which he still belongs. Bull simply loves formation skydiving and is happy to jump with anyone on the DZ, from a newly A-licensed jumper to the most experienced of load organizers. He is an ambassador for the sport and the kind of guy you can’t help but love. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Rob Crimmins

I first learned of skydiving in 1961 at the age of 6. The television show “Ripcord,” about two guys who provided almost entirely fictitious parachuting services, aired that year. My older brother and I didn’t mind the implausible events, because we didn’t watch for the stories. We wanted to see the show’s stars in freefall, and those scenes were all real, taken with helmet cameras and from airplanes.

Until I grew to a size that made it consistently painful, I jumped off things. We lived on the water in Hampton, Virginia. The seawall stood four to six feet over beach sand, so that was a good spot. In the woods, we could leap from trees into nets formed of vines 10 or 20 feet below. That was risky, and there were times when I fell through to the ground, but I was never injured. We’d leap from the tops of the channel markers in the Chesapeake Bay, too. That venue allowed us to compound the fun, because another compulsion some of us had was to reach the bottom of every body of water we swam in, even when it was impossibly deep. more »

A Long Night in a Swamp

As a SoCal jumper, I don't have to worry that much about landing in trees or anything green. So I took seriously memorizing the DZ's aerial photo (the kind all DZs have hanging near manifest) when I went jumping in Maine. I knew where all the tree groves were, along with power lines, ditches and other obstructions. After a couple of jumps, I got comfy with the landing pattern, and I felt I knew my way around.

Around sunset, some good-sized cumulus clouds showed up, and I decided a hop-and-pop at 12,500 feet would give me some good photo opportunities. The view was indeed spectacular, and every minute or so, I would glance at the DZ to make sure I could get back. more »

Avoiding Canopy Collisions - Breakoff Separation

As skydiving continues to progress—with jumpers now enjoying a wide variety of disciplines and piloting faster canopies—it has become more challenging to find clear airspace at deployment time. Since 1999, 11 jumpers have died in canopy collisions. Additionally, there were many instances of collisions that resulted in injuries or cutaways, although the exact number is unknown.  more »

Providing Your Students the Best

One of the most important of an instructional rating holder’s tasks is ensuring that each student receives proper training for the USPA A license. Part of this responsibility includes making logbook entries and initialing required items on the USPA A-License Proficiency Card or A-License Progression Card to properly track and document this training. Some instructors are very good about making logbook entries and updating the license cards, but many could use improvement, and drop zones handle this process in a seemingly infinite number of ways. more »

Floating Handle

This jumper experienced a floating reserve ripcord handle while jumping with a costume for a television commercial. He received multiple gear checks before exiting, but the handle dislodged as he moved toward the door of the airplane. Although the handle floated loose, the reserve ripcord pin stayed in place throughout the freefall and canopy descent, and the jump was otherwise uneventful. more »

Mixed Formation Skydiving Random F (Totem)

 

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by David Cherry. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Gearing Up - June 2017

Ed Scott

In "Five Minute Call," you'll read of the Oklahoma DZ owner whom a court ordered to pay a substantial sum to a 16-year-old injured in 2014 during a static-line first jump. Coincidentally, during that period, USPA's board of directors was once again debating what the Basic Safety Requirements should state as the minimum age to skydive. more »

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Ed Scott
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