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99 Problems, But The Wind Ain’t One

99 Problems, But The Wind Ain’t One

Given that wind conditions change constantly, being able to properly read and compensate for them is an important skill set for students and competition pilots alike.  more »

Finding the FLOW

Finding the FLOW

What Four High-Profile Accidents Can Teach Us About Finding the Ideal Mental State for Survival more »

Practical Tips for Cloud Clearance

Practical Tips for Cloud Clearance

Most jumpers have a difficult time remembering the cloud clearance regulations, but understanding the reasons for the different altitude requirements can help you remember the necessary information. more »

Winter is Coming

Winter is Coming

Winter comes for all of us, whether you’re of the Great House of Chicagoland or the Great House of Perris. While the season’s arrival clearly hits the Lords of the North hardest, every skydiver in the 50 Kingdoms needs to maintain at least some awareness of cold-season strategy. more »

A Long Night in a Swamp

As a SoCal jumper, I don't have to worry that much about landing in trees or anything green. So I took seriously memorizing the DZ's aerial photo (the kind all DZs have hanging near manifest) when I went jumping in Maine. I knew where all the tree groves were, along with power lines, ditches and other obstructions. After a couple of jumps, I got comfy with the landing pattern, and I felt I knew my way around.

Around sunset, some good-sized cumulus clouds showed up, and I decided a hop-and-pop at 12,500 feet would give me some good photo opportunities. The view was indeed spectacular, and every minute or so, I would glance at the DZ to make sure I could get back. more »

Avoiding Canopy Collisions - Breakoff Separation

As skydiving continues to progress—with jumpers now enjoying a wide variety of disciplines and piloting faster canopies—it has become more challenging to find clear airspace at deployment time. Since 1999, 11 jumpers have died in canopy collisions. Additionally, there were many instances of collisions that resulted in injuries or cutaways, although the exact number is unknown.  more »

Providing Your Students the Best

One of the most important of an instructional rating holder’s tasks is ensuring that each student receives proper training for the USPA A license. Part of this responsibility includes making logbook entries and initialing required items on the USPA A-License Proficiency Card or A-License Progression Card to properly track and document this training. Some instructors are very good about making logbook entries and updating the license cards, but many could use improvement, and drop zones handle this process in a seemingly infinite number of ways. more »

Floating Handle

This jumper experienced a floating reserve ripcord handle while jumping with a costume for a television commercial. He received multiple gear checks before exiting, but the handle dislodged as he moved toward the door of the airplane. Although the handle floated loose, the reserve ripcord pin stayed in place throughout the freefall and canopy descent, and the jump was otherwise uneventful. more »

Mixed Formation Skydiving Random F (Totem)

 

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Photos by David Cherry. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

Gearing Up - June 2017

Ed Scott

In "Five Minute Call," you'll read of the Oklahoma DZ owner whom a court ordered to pay a substantial sum to a 16-year-old injured in 2014 during a static-line first jump. Coincidentally, during that period, USPA's board of directors was once again debating what the Basic Safety Requirements should state as the minimum age to skydive. more »

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

By Sharon Har-Noy with contributions from Claudio Cagnasso, Luis Adolfo Lopez-Mendez and Luis Prinetto. Photos by Gustavo Cabana.

In the film “Crosswind” by Patrick Passe, Omar Alhegelan is mind-blowing as he elegantly whizzes around the sky on his feet. (If you consider yourself a freeflyer but have never seen “Crosswind,” put down this magazine for an hour and go online to do your homework.) When the film came out in 2001, you could count on one hand the number of people who could pull off something like that, but today it’s common to see feet-first angle jumps at most events. It’s great that jumpers are finally catching up to what the pioneers were doing 16 years ago, but with so much freefall traffic and so many people trying new things, it’s essential for everyone to learn how to be safe so we can keep on playing. more »

Have You Checked Your Six?

“Check your six”: a popular military expression meaning, “Check your six o’clock position” (the spot directly behind you).


Every day, high-performance-wing technology moves forward and canopy pilots push the envelope harder than ever. Where high-performance landings were once the domain of a few, the availability of better technology, faster wings and expert canopy coaching have made them an everyday sight at drop zones around the world. XRW (mixed canopy piloting and wingsuit formations), competitive canopy piloting and other extreme canopy flights that require small canopies, high wing loadings and great speeds were once on the periphery of the sport but are now increasingly common. more »

15 Minutes of Fame

Fifteen minutes of fame. Everybody will have it once. I had mine in 1987 because I saved a life while skydiving.

Andy Warhol, the iconic 1960s American artist, is credited with the creation of the concept. This was long before the internet and YouTube. Back then, a person’s 15 minutes of fame depended on newspapers, a few broadcast TV channels and magazines. But even with the lack of today’s instantaneously streaming video, some events caught the attention of publishers and found their way to the public in a firestorm of media attention. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - John Cheesmond

 “It’ll change your life!” How often do we hear skydivers say this while trying to describe the indescribable experience to potential flyers? I often find myself looking out the door of the airplane, nodding at the beauty of the sky in a private moment that you all unknowingly share with me, then get back to focusing on the skydive and the incredible moments that the next few minutes hold. more »

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Staff

Ed Scott
Publisher

Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

Laura Sharp
Managing Editor

Colby Walls
Graphic Designer

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