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Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

Defining an Era—B.J. Worth Receives the 2015 USPA Lifetime Achievement Award

B.J. Worth did not just influence the sport of skydiving, he defined an era. His thumbprint appears on most of the significant developments from the 1970s through the last decade. more »

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

How to Dance With the Nylon in the Pale Moonlight—Setting Yourself Up for a Great Night Jump

If you’re squaring up to the requirements for your D license, there’s a good possibility that those jumps are causing a bit of nail-biting. Steve Woodford is here to tell you not to worry. more »

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Deadly Serious - Avoiding a Canopy Collision

Greg was a typical young parachutist with a great sense of humor who loved to joke with his fellow jumpers. But when it came to skydiving, he was quiet and deadly serious. more »

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

Up Is the New Down—Part 2: Movement Jumps

It’s great that jumpers are finally catching up to what the pioneers were doing 16 years ago, but with so much freefall traffic and so many people trying new things, it’s essential for everyone to learn how to be safe so we can keep on playing. more »

Administrative Professionals

Most skydiving instructors would call themselves skydiving professionals, and most have the excellent teaching skills and air skills needed to be a pro. However, rating holders also need to be knowledgeable about the Federal Aviation Administration regulations and USPA requirements to really achieve pro status. more »

Gearing Up - October 2016

EdScott

Skydivers who enter USPA's instructional rating hierarchy by becoming a coach, instructor or examiner take on immense responsibility. But it is the USPA Examiner who assumes the highest responsibility, since he has the sole privilege of teaching and certifying others to be coaches and instructors.
An examiner's failure to fully meet his number-one duty—to fully teach and certify a skydive instructor—has a threefold effect: Instructors are inadequately prepared and can't be all they are expected to be. This leads to students who are not thoroughly trained or motivated, which decreases their safety levels and increases the chances that they'll quit out of frustration. And then the sport suffers a decrease in participants and a potential black eye from incidents or accidents that were preventable. more »

Why Stall?

Anyone who takes a quick look at the USPA Canopy Piloting Proficiency Card (the completion of which is required to receive a B license) will notice that most of the maneuvers are of the slow-flight variety. The big question jumpers always ask is, “Why do I need to perform stalls? What practical application does it offer?” Learning more about slow flight and stalls not only prepares you to land your parachute better, but also teaches you just how versatile your wing can be. more »

Profile - David "T.K." Hayes | D-18764

by Brian Giboney

David “T.K.” Hayes, D-18764, manages Skydive City Zephyrhills in Florida. Originally from Canada, Hayes cut away from a good career at IBM to pursue a career in skydiving. He made his first jump in 1981 at the age of 20. Thirty-five years later, he is still in love with the sport. Hayes holds almost every instructional rating there is (in both the U.S. and Canada) and is a strong supporter of canopy piloting competitions. more »

How Skydiving Changed My Life - Michael Hoover

by Michael Hoover | C-43743 | Finleyville, Pennsylvania

When I got my pre-second issue of Parachutist, as soon as I read “How Skydiving Changed My Life, ” I knew I wanted to write one. But I was barely licensed and hadn't been in the sport long enough to know what effect it would have on me. Now, more than a year later, I have learned much more. more »

Tales from the Bonfire - Take Not Thine Altitude for Granted

by Joe McHenry | D-6770 | Newport, Pennsylvania

Unlike other commandments that I was taught in first-jump class, “Take not thine altitude for granted, lest the earth rise up and smite thee,” is carved in stone. more »

Choosing the Right Goal

Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Sherpa are credited with being the first to summit the world’s highest mountain, Sagarmatha, or as we know it, Mount Everest. But that’s not true. There were undoubtedly several who reached the summit before them. However, they were the first to summit and return back down safely.

Setting just any goal won’t do. Choosing the right goal is crucial. more »

Public Jumps

Performers often hear “Break a leg!” before the start of a performance, but it’s not really what a skydiver wants to do during a demo. Almost all of us have thought about making a demo jump of some sort, whether jumping into a party out in the middle of nowhere or jumping into a 70,000-seat NFL stadium. Landing your parachute in front of a crowd of non-skydivers is a lot of fun, and who wouldn’t want to have a chance to be a rock star for a day? But jumping into places outside of your regular drop zone can be tricky. Demos require proper planning and execution—including adherence to Federal Aviation Administration Regulations and USPA Basic Safety Requirements—to ensure that the jumps are successful. more »

Dislodged Handle

During a formation skydive, the videographer noticed that this jumper’s reserve-ripcord handle had dislodged from his harness. As the videographer moved into position to warn the jumper about the handle, the group reached its breakoff altitude and the jumper tracked away and deployed his main canopy without incident. He later said that he could feel the handle flapping against his side right after the exit. more »

Belly-To-Back Backflip Transition

Axis Flight Logo Skydive Arizona Logo

Brought to you by Niklas Daniel and Brianne Thompson of AXIS Flight School at Skydive Arizona in Eloy. Aerial photo by Seth Studer. Ground photos by David Arnett. Information about AXIS' coaching and instructional services is available at axisflightschool.com. more »

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Ed Scott
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Elijah Florio
Editor in Chief, Advertising Manager

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